Afterlifethoughts & Angels: Part Two

2528715602_5563b7a9de_bWe need our angels now more than ever before…

 

Thanksgiving Edition: I’m posting a few days early since I thought you might want to try this idea tomorrow, probably not at the dinner table, but in private! ūüėȬ†

Dear Friends,

First of all, Happy almost-Thanksgiving to those of you who celebrate it!

Recently I read Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal¬†by Anthony William. Although I’ve established I’m a bit of a “woo woo” gal, I initially didn’t feel drawn to reading it because I was turned off by the Panglossian title. But thanks to my mercurial mind, I eventually read a sample on my Kindle and gave it a chance.¬†

In the first section, Anthony William depicts his extraordinary life. Critics can pan the book all they like, but the book has been a New York Times bestseller, and it has been endorsed by numerous celebrities and physicians.

I found William’s bizarre gift and upbringing fascinating, but I won’t give away any spoilers, so I’ll leave it at that.¬†

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However, I won’t be spoiling anything by discussing one of William’s self-help chapters about angels.¬†

I haven’t blogged much about religion, and don’t worry, I’m not about to start doing it now, but I think it’s helpful if I share a few facts. I was born Jewish, but I’m not religious and I didn’t attend Hebrew school. I believe there is a higher power, which technically makes me agnostic, a word that sounds as cool as “moist” or “constipated.”

I’ve never been into angels unless they were attached to “food cakes,” but after reading William’s information about praying to obscure angels, I¬†was intrigued.¬†His instructions were easy, free and seemed harmless. I decided to try out his suggestions, but I was skeptical.

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In chapter twenty-three, Essential Angels, William writes about different angels including a group he calls the¬†Unknown Angels. These are not the “superstar” angels like Archangel Gabriel and Archangel Michael that even this agnostic knows about. The Unknown Angels are the unsung angels that don’t have specific names, and there are many of them – we’re talking thousands.

Williams asserts that the Unknown Angels are some of the most powerful angels around, but they are the least in demand, and they are “eager for the chance to work on us.” ¬†

The catch to this exercise is that if you decide to appeal to these angels, you need¬†to ask for their help out loud.¬†I keep it super-simple, i.e. “Hi Unknown Angels, can you please help me with ¬†XYZ – thank you!” If you’re deaf, have a speech impairment, or are too weak to speak, William suggests using sign language or your thoughts to ask the Angel of Deliverance, who will “express your soul’s wishes to the other angels.” (To those muttering non-angelic words right now, I beseech you to roll with this!)

Also, I encourage you to read this chapter in its entirety, as I’m leaving out 95%, but I’m sharing the bare minimum that has helped me.

This information might sound¬†hippie-dippie or not jibe with your religious beliefs. But after I self-consciously uttered a prayer about a problem that was promptly and unexpectedly solved, I wasn’t so cynical. At the very least, talking to the Unknown Angels has gotten me out of my usual loop of negative thoughts, and I like how that feels.

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My prayers to the Unknown Angels aren’t always answered¬†or answered exactly the way I want them. Still, I’m getting results that convince me to appeal to these mysterious Unknown Angels, especially when I pray during moments when I’m totally stressing out.

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Sometimes this lovely meme’s concept simply isn’t possible, i.e. Thanksgiving dinner. I’m a sucker for a cute animal meme, so I’m using it anyway!

The placebo effect could definitely play a part in some of my prayer successes – I don’t know, and frankly it doesn’t matter. I’m just grateful to have this option because the act of doing it seems to reduce my anxiety. I don’t feel so alone with my problem, be it great (worry about the health of a loved one) or small. (I’m too embarrassed to admit my small prayers, but they might be about things such as finding a parking spot or landing a hard-to-find child’s Halloween costume. Maybe.)

While writing this post, I visited Anthony William’s blog and found a¬†post about Life-Changing Angels, the twelve female angels (go Girl Power!) discussed in his second book Life-Changing Foods: Save Yourself And The Ones You Love With The Hidden Healing Powers Of Fruits And Vegetables.¬†I don’t want to overwhelm you, but you might want to take a peek at that post.

If this topic sounds remotely interesting, please check out William’s book at your library, or splurge – it’s not cheap (even for the Kindle version) hovering around $15.00, so the library might be your best bet.

I’d love to know if you try reaching out to the Unknown Angels and what happens…

Until next week, please take good care of yourselves. I send you lots of love and strength to get through these challenging holidays!

Love,

Dyane

 

Dyane‚Äôs memoir¬†Birth of a New Brain ‚Äď Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder¬†with a foreword by Dr. Carol Henshaw (co-author of¬†The Modern Management of Perinatal Psychiatry)¬†will be published by¬†Post Hill Press¬†in October 2017.

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Rambling Alongside Fall Creek State Park

 

Come, ramble with me and Lucy alongside beautiful Fall Creek State Park!

I only say “anyway” fifty-six times in this clip, down from¬†eighty times in my previous vlog. The loud sniffles you hear that could wake the dead are caused by my allergies that always flare up after a heavy rain. (Note to self, next time take a pocket pack of Puffs tissues!)

Because the past week has been far more hectic than usual, I’ll catch up with your blogs this weekend. I promise to comment, “like”, tweet, and Facebook- share your latest posts until the cows banana slugs come home.

images(Leave it to me to choose a college with a banana slug mascot.)

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See you next week,

XoXo — Dyane

p.s. During my walk I mention my writing mentor Wendy K. Williamson’s books; she wrote the awesome memoir¬†

I’m Not Crazy Just Bipolar

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and co-wrote Two Bipolar Chicks Guide to Survival: Tips for Living With Bipolar Disorder with Honora Rose

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Dyane‚Äôs memoir¬†Birth of a New Brain ‚Äď Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder¬†with a foreword by Dr. Carol Henshaw (co-author of¬†The Modern Management of Perinatal Psychiatry)¬†will be published by¬†Post Hill Press¬†in October 2017.

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An Angel With Fur & An Unexpected Miracle!

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Happy Monday Everyone!

I’ve only reblogged a handful of times. I have a point of pride (some may call it stubbornness, neuroticism, controlling or all three!) where I wish to be the primary author of my blog posts all the time. But today I’m going to have my hands full because we are on the cusp of adding a very, very, VERY-much wanted little Sheltie mix pup into our home. ¬†So reblog Monday it is!

Honestly, I feel a little bit like the way I felt before having my two babies! I’m taking this puppy business very seriously. In my early twenties I adopted two glorious puppies who I loved for fifteen years. One of these dogs, my Sheltie/wolf mix Tara, was in our wedding as our flower “beast”. ¬†She looked resplendent with a gorgeous calla lily corsage and loved all the attention. ¬†My other dog Shera, an fluffy white American Eskimo, also attended our wedding. She “danced” with some of us after the ceremony. (Her breed is known for producing show dogs and they used to perform in circuses. “Eskies” are energetic, bouncy balls of joy and they truly love the attention of a crowd.)

My dogs, who Craig adopted and loved as much as I did, accompanied us on our honeymoon in Mammoth. We considered them to be family members – perhaps the most functional out of all of us, and they didn’t even need therapy! ¬†And don’t even get me started on how I held each of them in my arms when they died…I’ve written about that topic before, and I can’t dwell on it for more than a moment without feeling my heart crack a little. We were lucky to have both dogs live until age fifteen, which was at the very top of their projected life spans.

It has been a few years since we had a dog in our home, and I know I’m going to have my hands full this morning with getting ready to care for our new, spunky little life. ¬†In light of this exciting, momentous change, I thought today might be a good time to reblog, especially (and this is the most important reason to reblog) because the post is worthy of reblogging – I read yesterday and it really inspired and moved me. ¬†It’s a beautiful story about a true miracle.

I hope Mariska’s post will inspire and move you as well!

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bipolar mums

Less than a week ago, I underwent eye surgery to remove a cataract I’d had since birth in my right eye.

In the lead up to the surgery, I was completely focused on the risks associated with the surgery: that I‚Äôd end up with no sight at all in my right eye or ‚Äď even worse ‚Äď that my ‚Äėgood‚Äô left eye would be damaged.

Despite there only being a 1% chance of being left blind, this was enough to have me freaked out.¬† What if I never saw my children or¬†husband¬†again?¬† What if I had to give up a job I loved to stay at home ‚Äď blind? What if I had to live in a bleak, dark world for the rest of my life?

I got so caught up worrying about the surgery, that I completely forgot to hope ‚Äď or pray ‚Äď for a miracle.¬† When friends‚Ķ

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