Another beautifully written book review!

MePlease visit Brandy’s new blog Live Mentally Well. It’s another excellent blog and here’s an excerpt from her About page:

Welcome to Live Mentally Well. I’m Brandy. Like you, I struggle every day to get well and stay well, go to work, and take care of my family. I developed Dissociative Disorder as a young child. Like PTSD, Dissociative Disorder is a result of some form of trauma which for me was child abuse. Later in childhood, I developed Social Anxiety and finally Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Just when I thought I was out of the woods I was hit with a new diagnosis.  I developed Postpartum Bipolar Disorder which later became Bipolar I Disorder. So 15 years ago I desperately began seeking mental wellness. I have been in recovery now for many years. Recovery means something different for many people. For me, it means making a commitment to mental wellness, learning about my mental illnesses, close monitoring, working with the mental health professionals, and using coping skills and tools to compensate for symptoms and medication side effects. 

From my thrill-a-minute life, I want to bring you the knowledge of a former mental health nurse and the real life experience of a mental health consumer. I have been actively speaking out for years about mental health stigma by openly sharing my mental illness throughout life. I want to be a voice for all the mental health consumers out there that aren’t able to speak out.

I hope you enjoy reading Live Mentally Well. The areas I am focusing on are, Bipolar, Anxiety, Depression, Navigating Mental Health, Trauma, and Ramblings in Recovery. Ramblings  in Recovery is an update of whatever I’m thinking about or dealing with.I hope you will share your stories with me as well. I look forward to hearing them. Leave questions, comments, and prayer requests down below. Suggestions for new posts are welcome as well.

———————————————-

I’m extremely grateful to receive two amazing reviews in one week from Samantha (My Bipolar Mind) and Brandy, who also had a father with bipolar disorder. Once again, thank you Brandy!!!!

https://livementallywell.com/categories/book-review-birth-of-a-new-brain

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Dyane Harwood, Author of Birth of a New Brain, Q&A Session

Here’s the Q & A section of Samantha’s “My Bipolar Mind” blog – she created great questions for me to answer!

My Bipolar Mind

Dyane Harwood, Author of Birth of a New Brain, Q&A Session


Today, I would like you to give a warm welcome to a special guest – and new dear friend of mine, Author Dyane Harwood. Dyane took a timeout to participate in a fun Q&A session with us for her book Birth of a New Brain–Healing From Postpartum Bipolar Disorder. If you haven’t had the chance to check out my review of her book, you can do so by Clicking Here. I hope you enjoy reading Dyane’s answers as much as I enjoyed asking her the following questions.


Dyane and her lovely family!

1. What inspired you to write Birth of a New Brain—Healing from Postpartum
Bipolar Disorder
?

I’ve been a voracious reader ever since I was
a child. Books have always served as my teachers. After my postpartum bipolar
disorder was activated (which was similar to…

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Book Review & Thoughts On Birth of a New Brain by Dyane Harwood

Thanks to Samantha Steiner, blogger & soon-to-be author of “My Bipolar Mind” for this wonderful Q & A and book review!

My Bipolar Mind

Book Review & Thoughts On Birth of a New Brain by Dyane Harwood


Birth of a New Brain by Dyane Harwood follows her harrowing journey of living with mental illness – something she thought would never happen to her. But, honestly, who does? Dyane takes you on an amazing adventure as she shares her whole life with her readers. She walks you through her less than perfect childhood. You are right there with her as she discusses what it was like to grow up with a father who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

Dyane vividly explains her first brush with hypomania, well before she ever received her diagnoses. She entails her many heartbreaks before finding the love of her life, her husband Craig. After they got married, Dyane finds out that she is pregnant and the birth of her first daughter, Avonlea, goes off without a hitch.

Fast forward to the…

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Book Review: Dyane Hardwood’s Birth of a New Brain

I’m still on blogging hiatus BUT I could not resist sharing this wonderful review by fellow author/blogger extraordinaire Cassandra Stout.

Her blog is one of THE best blogs about bipolar disorder & even if you’re not a parent. And she’ll have a book of her own coming out which I can’t wait to read! So pease go take a look at her blog & follow it. Cass is also on Twitter.

Sending everyone lots of love & have a great weekend!!!

Xo, Dyane

The Bipolar Parent

birth of a new brainDyane Harwood’s brilliant memoir, Birth of a New Brain.

Dyane Hardwood’s brilliant breakout memoir, Birth of a New Brain, chronicles her heartbreaking struggle for stability after the onset of postpartum bipolar disorder. Dyane’s battle to reestablish her mental health from the ravages of mania and the pits of depression is recorded in a gripping account with an almost-journalistic flair.

An often overlooked and misunderstood perinatal mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD), postpartum bipolar disorder is listed in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as part of the bipolar spectrum. In Dyane’s case, she suffers from a severe form of “treatment-resistant” bipolar I disorder, which spirals high into manic episodes and deep down into soul-sucking depressions.

Dyane deserves all of the praise her novel has received from various sources. It’s a fascinating account with a structure unique to memoir: Dyane takes us from…

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Bipolar Book Review: Birth of a New Brain

Better Bipolar

Birth of a New Brain: Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder

Dyane Harwood

Once I started reading this book I couldn’t put it down. You instantly feel connected to the author and all you want is for her to find the solution to her mysterious disease.

She does an amazing job in showing the reader the reality of the bipolar disease including mania. “It was incredible to feel so creative, but my rapid thoughts scared me and made me anxious.” When I read that I was like, yup, exactly, and she continued from there.

Her memoir is so honest in its portrayal of the poor mental healthcare that is available in this country. Her challenges and triumphs with various medications will speak to anyone who’s been through the medication roller coaster.

She also brings to light the challenge of trying to work when your body is simply not cooperating. How we…

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Brainy Book Review

Although I’m still on hiatus, I can feel the pull of the blogosphere again. I’ll be returning soon but in the meantime I’d like to share this wonderful review of “Birth of a New Brain” written by blogger/author Libby Baker Sweiger. Please check out Libby’s blog and thanks for stopping by to read her review!

See you soon with the latest goings on since I broke my jaw in February! 🙂

Love,

Dyane

Libby Baker Sweiger

img_20180619_185512_565“Rabbit’s clever,” said Pooh thoughtfully.
“Yes,” said Piglet, “Rabbit’s clever.”
“And he has Brain.”
“Yes,” said Piglet, “Rabbit has Brain.”
There was a long silence.
“I suppose,” said Pooh, “that that’s why he never understands anything.”
― A.A. MilneWinnie-the-Pooh

This quote reminds me of my brain as a person with bipolar 1 disorder!  As a late

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A Tale of 2 Breaks (My Broken Jaw & My Blogging Hiatus)

My jaw!

 

Last Saturday afternoon I was walking by myself on a flat, concrete surface a few blocks away from our house. It was a sunny, beautiful day. I finally felt healthy after having reached my weight loss goal. (I had gained twenty-five pounds after my book was published thanks to a daily dose of two high-end chocolate bars, chocolate gelato, and chocolate Italian pastries.) 

I was looking forward to a rare evening alone with my husband Craig while our girls were at a sleepover party.

All was well in my world—until I checked a text on my cell phone and tripped. 

In a matter of seconds, I fell forward and slammed down onto the concrete face-first, specifically jaw first. I felt the lower half of my face crunch and I knew I had broken something. I had also gashed my chin in what turned out to be a minor injury, but it was scary and painful nonetheless. At first, I had no idea how bad the gash was since I couldn’t see my face.

As I sat there on the ground, shaking and terrified, blood poured out of my lacerated chin. I reminded myself that a cut can often bleed heavily yet not be that bad. I pressed one hand hard against my chin to stanch the bleeding and my skin stung at the contact.

Not a soul was in sight and that was unusual. But I didn’t want anyone to see me that way—I only wanted one person’s presence: Craig. Luckily I had my cell phone and I was able to reach him. The reception sucked but he heard my crying and the words “fall,” “bleeding” and the street name.

He had just dropped our girls off at the sleepover and came to get me. Even though it took him less than 12 minutes to arrive, it felt like forever. As I sat there, I prayed. Yes, I prayed. I prayed to every spiritual figure and angel I could think of, I prayed to my father, I prayed to my grandmother, and then I visualized bright light healing whatever was wrong with my jaw and chin.

When Craig got there, he took one look at me and said, “We’re going to the E.R.” Four hours, several chin stitches and one CT scan later, I was told by the E.R. physician that he conferred with a maxillofacial surgeon. I didn’t even know what a maxillofacial surgeon was, exactly, but I’d soon find out. Here’s a nutshell definition: “Oral and maxillofacial surgeons focus on treating problems related to the hard and soft tissues of the face, mouth, and jaws (the upper jaw is referred to as the maxilla).”

You could say it wasn’t exactly the romantic evening date I had imagined. 

The surgeon offered to call me the next day, which was a Sunday, to offer his advice. I was extremely relieved to get his call. During our conversation, he gave me different options to consider, including treatment at other practices, and he patiently answered my questions. My intuition told me he was a good doctor. (God knows I’ve spoken to a gazillion doctors and I can tell a golden egg from a bad egg if you know what I mean!) 

I met with him for my consult last Monday since time was a big concern – I only had a two-week window to get the surgery done so my jaw would heal properly.

When I met him, he reminded me of the ECT anesthesiologist I wrote about in Birth of a New Brain. Once again, I encountered a doctor who was a lot younger than me who looked like he could be on the cover of Surfer Magazine! 

After we met, I booked him to do my surgery which will be on Monday the 19th. I’m having pins put in different places in my jaw. He’s attaching tight bands that will help the jaw and teeth alignment heal back into the right position; yes, bands, not wires.

I haven’t been able to chew any food but I love smoothies and pureed soups, so I’m not freaking out. I even throw in organic baby spinach in my vanilla Orgain & coconut milk smoothies since I can’t chew lettuce. (The smoothie actually tastes good because you can’t taste the spinach!)

I’ve been hypervigilant about walking carefully—I’m so scared I’ll trip again. I long for the time when I wasn’t worried about such a basic activity. And yes, I feel like a f*cking idiot this happened in the first place, but I can tell you I got the message loud and clear from the universe that I need to be more present. 

I wanted to return to the place where I tripped so I wouldn’t become phobic, so I went there two days after my accident and it was fine. (I think I walked in slow motion, but it was fine.)

In all seriousness, though, in light of the Parkland shootings and all the other horrible, tragic events we read and hear about day after day, my injury is teeny-tiny in comparison. Yet it’s my reality.

If my accident had happened before I found the meds that eradicated my treatment-resistant bipolar depression, I would’ve plummeted into an even deeper depression. However, after the pain and shock of the first 24 hours post-accident, I’ve been doing relatively well mentally. I haven’t binged, either – of course, not being able to chew certainly helps me avoid doing that, but I haven’t wanted to compulsively overeat at all—this is another positive surprise. I’m very thankful for these blessings and I’m relieved that my injuries weren’t worse, i.e. a head surgery or a serious illness.  

 

Thank God not all falls are bad. I’ve hiked up to Yosemite Falls and it was spectacular. The fall is one of my favorite seasons, and, of course, there’s the best fall of all: falling in love.

Singer/songwriter Sam Phillips, the former Christian pop artist and ex-wife of producer T Bone Burnett, has an unusual voice. She was originally promoted as the “Christian Cyndi Lauper” and composed the score for the television show Gilmore Girls.

I love Sam Phillips’ voice, in part, because Craig introduced me to her Martinis and Bikinis album when we first got together in 1998. Her song “When I Fall” (featured in The Last Supper film soundtrack) sums up my 20-year-long relationship with Craig.

She sings, “I think you’ll be there when I fall….”

And he was.

 

 

Parting Tidbits

I’ve published 441 posts on this blog and it has been a such a good run, to say the least! But I’ve been losing steam for blogging. I’ve neglected reading my beloved blogs and commenting, which feels plain-old-bad. It’s time to take a break from blogging and the blogosphere. 

Right after I made this decision, my good friend L.E. Henderson published the insightful postTo Blog or Not To Blog.Call me superstitious, but her post seemed like a sign I was making the right choice.

I’ve absolutely loved blogging and reading your blogs. It has been wonderful to make such amazing friends and to feel understood by many bloggers in the bipolar blogging community. To those of you who encouraged me as I approached my book’s publication date, your support helped me immensely. Before I take off, I’d like to share a few tidbits.

 

Tidbit #1 – Never Say Never

Two days before my accident, I attended a Meetup creative writing group for the first time. I used a lined notebook and a pen instead of my laptop. It turned out the founder of the group did the same thing—we were the only two members who showed up! (Meetup is kind of like that…)  Handwriting felt strange and painful as far as my wrist was concerned, but it was good, too.

Handwriting may have stirred up something in my brain. Some of you know I vowed I’d never write another book. Why? Reasons include: “I didn’t have a good idea,” “Aren’t there enough books in the world?,” “It’s so stressful,” and more. But after my Meetup, an idea came to me that got me excited. I relinquished my vow and I abandoned my reservations and I started writing a proposal! We’ll see where it goes…

 

Tidbit #2 – My Remote Presentation at the 2020 Mom Project’s 2018 Annual Forum 

If you watch this, please jump to where therapist and Mom and Mind podcast host Dr. Kat Kaeni appears at the 14.30 mark. She introduces my presentation.

 

Tidbit #3 Awesome Website/Blog/Resources & More

Laura Marchildon of Our Bipolar Family has an incredible website, including a great book review section. Check it out at this link. Laura wrote a book review about Birth of a New Brain here

Please keep in touch with me on Twitter (@DyaneHarwood) and check back here once in a while…

Take care, my friends!

Lots and lots of love,

Dyane

 

Birth of a New Brain – Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder

Foreword by the acclaimed perinatal psychiatrist and author Dr. Carol Henshaw. Please visit Amazon to order a Kindle or paperback version—thank you!

JamisonBook